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What Prepared Me to See Pollock's Over-Splatter

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  Jackson Pollock's  Over-Splatter,   How They Happened, Where They are Located, Why They Went Unnoted for More than Fifty Years, and How They May be Understood and Put to Use By Sandy Kinnee and Lauren Kinnee, Ph.D. Once You See the Drips You will Always See them PELUDE What Prepared Me to See Pollock's Over-Splatter I believe part what prepared me to notice the stray drips in Pollocks paintings was my fascination with Al Hirschfeld's caricatures which appeared every Sunday in the Arts and Leisure section of the New York Times. Each Sunday I looked forward to see how many times the name of Hirschfeld's daughter, Nina, was hidden in his caricature. The number next to his signature indicated the number of times NINA could be found. I was good at it and it was fun. Finding Nina was a game. In a black and white line drawing certain areas would be prime NINA hiding places, week after week. Any type of hair and fold in clothing were where I would search first. Another compon

Introduction to Jackson Pollock's Over-Splatter

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  Jackson Pollock's Over-Splatter,   How They Happened, Where They are Located, Why They Went Unnoted for More than Fifty Years, and How They May be Understood and Put to Use By Sandy Kinnee and Lauren Kinnee, Ph.D. Once You See the Drips You will Always See them PART 1 The following was written in 2002 and published in the online magazine Life Sherpa, April 2003 Art DNA: Pollock's Extra Drips by Sandy Kinnee Redwood trees belong in California. What would you make of the discovery of a stand of six redwood trees in an east coast forest surrounded by the expected indigenous deciduous oaks, maples, elms, and the odd birch thrown in for bio diversity? The following relates to my experience in front of some of my favorite paintings in the Museum of Modern Art. Just like you, when I look at an artwork, I come with my own baggage. What I've seen previously, what I know from school and my experience of working in museums, relationships with similar artworks, all come into play. Co

Jackson Pollock's Over-Splatter

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  Jackson Pollock's Over-Splatter,   How They Happened, Where They are Located, Why They Went Unnoted for More than Fifty Years, and How They May be Understood and Put to Use By Sandy Kinnee and Lauren Kinnee, Ph.D. Once You See the Drips You will Always See them PART 2 Jackson Pollock’s Stray Drips (Over-Splatter): Their origins and implications   Abstract   This paper proposes a wholly new method for reconstructing the chronology of Jackson Pollock's oeuvre based on the presence of drips of stray pigment on otherwise cohesive canvases.  Pollock, after having finished a painting and let it dry, moved it to the side in his studio where it occasionally accumulated drips and other marks that were the byproduct of his working method.  These marks, here termed ‘over-splatter,’ are present on both recto and verso of many Pollocks in major museums.  Lavender Mist of 1950, for example, has a large and distinctive red splotch on the front, right side that does not match any oth